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In this video tutorial our contributor, Jess Colvin, shows us how to easily and effectively trim and tidy your horse's mane. She explains how to get the look of a pulled mane using just a pair of scissors and a mane comb, making this the perfect trimming technique for sensitive horses.

 

Video Transcript;

“This tutorial is created on behalf of the Horsemart community. We hope that you find it useful.

“Today, I’m going to show you how I do my mane tidies. That's using just a pair of scissors and a mane comb. So that takes your main from ‘this’ to ‘this’ (referencing before and after images of the mane). If you have any questions, leave them in the comments.

“First up, I thought I would show you my bridle path. I usually aim for about an inch in width and locate it just under where the bridle would sit. You can maintain this either using scissors or a small battery operated trimmer.

“I use very simple steps with how I trim manes. First, I brush all of the mane through with a mane comb or mane brush. I then take a section of about an inch in width, back-comb it up as if you're going to pull it, and then I take my scissors and I cut it at the length that I'm after.

“Once I've done that, I will brush it back down and back through and repeat that process on that section of mane, until it is the height and length that I'm looking for. This process gives you an idea of a pulled or SoloComb look. So it's much more natural than just taking some scissors to the mane, but it does allow those horses that don't like their mane being pulled to have a trimmed mane, um, that is not blunt.

“If your horse has very thick mane, you can still use this method, but I would recommend that you use a SoloComb rake to rake the underneath of the mane, either before or after you start trimming. A tip for this would be to use warm water and bath the main first, or do it after exercise so that the horse is warm. It just helps the raking process that little bit more and makes it a bit more comfortable for the horse.

“I'm almost finished on this section now. I would just finish that off and then brush it down. As you can see, I’ll then go over the bottom at a slight angle with the scissors, just to even out anything that might be loose, and with any stray hairs on the ends.

“I'll just put a quick time-lapse in now, of me finishing the mane, for you to see the process.

“If you have any questions regarding this method, please leave them in the comments and I will do my best to help.”

Jessica Colvin
Horsemart Content Contributor
Published on 2020-06-17