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    10 Things You Should Know About Equine MRI Scans

    NewsGeneral Equestrian NewsMonday 17 June 2013
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    We’ve all heard about MRI scanning for humans but did you know it is proving hugely popular in the horse world.

    Here we find out more about the Hallmarq Standing Equine MRI Scanner.

    1 – The MRI Scanner provides high quality images of bone and soft tissue.  It is the only technique that distinguishes between the many causes of palmar foot pain and there is no need for general anaesthesia in most cases, eliminating the risk of mortality and allowing day-patient scheduling.

    2 – In 90% of cases diagnosis is within 24 hours, eliminating unnecessary and costly repeat tests and rest periods.  The system allows precise targeting of the treatment required.

    3 – The rapid diagnosis eliminates the risk of further damage during the conventional cycle of block-treat-rest-reexamination.

    4 – The MRI Scan requires the horses’ shoes to be removed before he is sedated and walked in to the room with one leg placed in the scanner.  The operator aligns the scanner with the injury site and many images are collected.  A professional interpretation and written report follows.

    5 – MRI Scanning should be considered when the chronic lameness has been localised to the foot or in the distal limb by nerve block and in the following situations:

    • radiographs are negative or equivocal
    • nuclear scintigraphy is being considered – or is negative
    • access by ultrasound is difficult or impossible
    • for penetrating injuries needing urgent attention
    • after acute onset of lameness during exercise
    • to monitor treatment and healing before returning to work

    6 – The MRI Scanning takes place in a special screened room.  A strong magnetic field and short pulses of radio waves are applied to the limb, and the weak resulting radio echo is used to create the image.

    7 – The signals from different substances differ, allowing fat (eg in bone) and water (eg oedema) to be distinguished.  No ionising radiation is used, and there are no known hazardous biological side effects.

    8 – Most insurance companies will now cover the cost of an MRI examination.

    9 – More than 37,000 horses have been scanned so far using a Standing Equine MRI Scanner.

    10 –MRI scans are available worlwide, there are now 64 standing equine MRI systems installed across five continents.

    For further information contact Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging on (01483) 877812 or visit www.hallmarq.net

    We’ve all heard about MRI scanning for humans but did you know it is proving hugely popular in the horse world.

    Here we find out more about the Hallmarq Standing Equine MRI Scanner.

     

    1 – The MRI Scanner provides high quality images of bone and soft tissue.  It is the only technique that distinguishes between the many causes of palmar foot pain and there is no need for general anaesthesia in most cases, eliminating the risk of mortality and allowing day-patient scheduling.

    2 – In 90% of cases diagnosis is within 24 hours, eliminating unnecessary and costly repeat tests and rest periods.  The system allows precise targeting of the treatment required.

    3 – The rapid diagnosis eliminates the risk of further damage during the conventional cycle of block-treat-rest-reexamination.

    4 – The MRI Scan requires the horses’ shoes to be removed before he is sedated and walked in to the room with one leg placed in the scanner.  The operator aligns the scanner with the injury site and many images are collected.  A professional interpretation and written report follows.

    5 – MRI Scanning should be considered when the chronic lameness has been localised to the foot or in the distal limb by nerve block and in the following situations:

    • radiographs are negative or equivocal
    • nuclear scintigraphy is being considered – or is negative
    • access by ultrasound is difficult or impossible
    • for penetrating injuries needing urgent attention
    • after acute onset of lameness during exercise
    • to monitor treatment and healing before returning to work

     

    6 – The MRI Scanning takes place in a special screened room.  A strong magnetic field and short pulses of radio waves are applied to the limb, and the weak resulting radio echo is used to create the image.

    7 – The signals from different substances differ, allowing fat (eg in bone) and water (eg oedema) to be distinguished.  No ionising radiation is used, and there are no known hazardous biological side effects.

    8 – Most insurance companies will now cover the cost of an MRI examination.

    9 – More than 37,000 horses have been scanned so far using a Standing Equine MRI Scanner.

    10 –MRI scans are available worldwide, there are now 64 standing equine MRI systems installed across five continents.

    For further information contact Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging on (01483) 877812 or visit www.hallmarq.net

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