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    How to write a CV for equine careers

    ArticleHow to - CareersFriday 01 May 2009
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    Looking for a new job and struggling to update or write a new CV?
     
    Here the team at www.equine-careers.co.uk offer five top tips to help you get writing and get noticed ahead of the competition.
     
    1 – Tailoring your CV
    Make sure your CV is tailored to the job you are applying for.  There is no point writing about your office skills if you are applying for a job as a groom.
     
    It may sound like a time consuming process, but making the effort to tailor your CV to suit the requirements of each particular job that you are applying for can greatly increase your chances of securing an interview. It is important that your personal details are at the start of the CV in order that potential employers can easily see and read name, address, contact details and so on.  Try to keep your CV short and to the point, two pages is usually the maximum.  Employers may have many CVs to look at and the easier they are to understand the more likely they are to put your forward to the interview stage.
     
    2 - Personal statement
    You have read the requirements of the advertised position and understand what qualities the recruiter is looking for in a candidate. Sum up your unique selling points and, in a brief sentence, state your accomplishments and how these will help you succeed in the job you are applying for. Your personal statement is one of the first things a potential new employer will read so spend plenty of time on this section.  If you want to work in an equine sales environment make sure your passion for this challenge comes across.
     
    3 - Employment history 
    If you are applying for a managerial position but have never previously worked as a manager, emphasise that your previous roles involved considerable responsibility and decision-making duties such as delegation, chairing meetings and training staff.
     
    If a separate role is more of a sideways step, you may want to focus more on innovative ways you have achieved success in the role to show your competency. Make it clear that whatever it is they want, you're able to fulfil their needs.
     
    Be realistic about the job you are applying for but it never hurts to set yourself a challenge. If you feel you have the right skills to turn your hand to equestrian marketing have a go – you never know!
     
    4 - Skills
    Presumably most of the roles you're after will have a similar set of skills, but that doesn't mean you should leave this section alone. Think how easy it would be for a recruiter to see that you're suitable if the skills you demonstrate are in the same order that they have on their job description.
     
    Think outside the box now and really get across the skills you have and are passionate about. If you like writing and have natural flair make the most of your talent – why not apply to work on an equestrian magazine.
     
    5 - Hobbies and interests
    Most job advertisements stipulate certain personality traits required for positions, so identify what they are and see how your hobbies can relate to the requirements.
     
    If you are applying for a senior position, then the fact that you are on your local Riding Club committee and run training sessions will demonstrate your leadership and organisational ability. If you are seeking a position as a graphic designer, then make reference to the equestrian exhibitions and events that you attend or are actively involved in.
     
    If you want to position yourself as one of the strongest candidates for the job, it is worth doing your homework on the company that you are applying to. Their job advert will provide you with a glimpse of what the company is like, but you can find valuable information on their corporate website that will help you to understand what they may be looking for in a job applicant. Try and make the way your CV comes across match their company ethos. 
     
    The last thing you want to do is be unprepared – make sure whatever information you include in your CV, you can back up and talk about when you get through to the interview stage.

    Visit www.equinecareers.co.uk to find out more or contact Emma Dyer on 07818 455309.

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